Posted by: williamaustinhouse | June 24, 2010

Facebook | Diane Layo McLafferty

Facebook | Diane Layo McLafferty

via Facebook | Diane Layo McLafferty.

Advertisements
Posted by: williamaustinhouse | March 12, 2010

just testing ping

Posted by: williamaustinhouse | March 6, 2010

Bess Jeffery

I think it’s interesting to note that Elizabeth (Bessie) Jeffery who once lived in this house with her sisters published a book of poetry “Gentle Sorcery” which can be found in the Ulysses Philomathic Library in Trumansburg.

Posted by: williamaustinhouse | February 22, 2010

Black Caps / Black Raspberries

It took a while for me to discover that within the scrub trees and brush that line the lot are black cap bushes.

When I first moved here, I started cutting and clearing bushes and trees that lined the lot to tidy it up a bit. When everything started growing back, I happily discovered that what I thought were just pesky thorned vines were actually black cap bushes.

Posted by: williamaustinhouse | February 21, 2010

Second Empire Style

The William Austin House is architecturally significant as an outstanding example of Second Empire style domestic architecture in the village of Trumansburg, Tompkins County. Characterized by a prominent, slate-clad Mansard roof, masonry construction, dormer and bay windows, massing and elaborate, Victorian era ornamentation, it embodies all of the distinctive characteristics of the type and period. It is the only Second Empire dwelling in the village of Trumansburg.

Posted by: williamaustinhouse | February 9, 2010

Austin House Show

Posted by: williamaustinhouse | February 1, 2010

Austin House Characteristics

The William Austin House is architecturally significant as an outstanding example of Second Empire style domestic architecture in the village of Trumansburg, Tompkins County.  Characterized by a prominent, slate-clad (originally) Mansard roof, masonry construction, dormer and bay windows, massing and elaborate, Victorian era ornamentation, it embodies all of the distinctive characteristics of the type and period.  It is the only Second Empire dwelling in the village of Trumansburg.

Posted by: williamaustinhouse | January 29, 2010

Austin to Jeffery

Mrs. Ann E. Austin expired on February 12, 1916 and the property was left to her daughters (Mary Austin Ogden, Ida M. Austin Astringer, Elizabeth Austin Wood, Helen Austin Halsey and Pearl Austin Haas) who eventually sold the property on July 14, 1928 to Mary Jane, Frances and Elizabeth (Bessie) Jeffery.

Posted by: williamaustinhouse | January 28, 2010

William Austin History Continued

According to his obituary in the Ithaca Daily Journal published on June 21, 1909, William died at 9:00 pm on June 20th, 1909 at his home at 77 years of age after a two week illness.  Also noted by The Ithaca Daily Journal of June 22, 1909, everyone trusted him, knowing his every utterance to be sincere and truthful.  He was a credited to his profession.  He gave his friendship slowly, but once given it was unreserved.  His Memory will long be cherished in the county.

Quoting from the Trumansburg Free Press of June 26, 1909, As a Lawyer Mr. Austin stood high among his associates; he was a diligent student and had accumulated one of the best selected libraries in the county.  For several years Mr. Austin had suffered partial blindness, a serious handicap, but he was ably assisted by his daughters and his legal papers were models of neatness and accuracy.  Mr. Austin has served a large clientage for nearly half a century and will be missed not only in his community but by the Bar of Tompkins County.

Posted by: williamaustinhouse | January 27, 2010

William Austin History Continued

According to his obituary in the Ithaca Daily Journal published on June 21, 1909, William died at 9:00 pm on June 20th, 1909 at his home at 77 years of age after a two week illness.  Also noted by The Ithaca Daily Journal of June 22, 1909, everyone trusted him, knowing his every utterance to be sincere and truthful.  He was a credited to his profession.  He gave his friendship slowly, but once given it was unreserved.  His Memory will long be cherished in the county.

Quoting from the Trumansburg Free Press of June 26, 1909, As a Lawyer Mr. Austin stood high among his associates, he was a diligent student and had accumulated one of the best selected libraries in the county.  For several years Mr. Austin had suffered partial blindness, a serious handicap, but he was ably assisted by his daughters and his legal papers were models of neatness and accuracy.  Mr. Austin has served a large clientage for nearly half a century and will be missed not only in his community but by the Bar of Tompkins County.

Older Posts »

Categories